This really did work for me!

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I’ve been writing, writing a very important book.

It’s about how I took the foster/parent training and made it work.

If you are a foster/adoptive parent then you know what I am saying.

The things that matter.  Bonds, families, siblings, discipline and love.

I did drink a lot of coffee, but I love what this book says.

You see, if you are not a foster parent, but have thought about it, you need to read this.

I will explain why, right now.

Years ago, some nearly twenty years, I made a decision that changed my life.  I became a foster parent.  I didn’t dream this, I didn’t crave this, it was not my biggest desire, but, I knew I was called to do this.

At my heart, my greatest desire is to write.  Music, books,  poems, anything that matters and can make a difference.  Foster parents make a difference.

The problem has escalated way beyond twenty years ago.

Drug abuse is at an all time high.  So is terrorism.

These two things alone put children in a place without parents.

So, in comes the foster parent.

Or so you would hope.

But there are not enough foster parents to go around.

Children are in group homes, a pretty name for an orphanage.

Here in the United States and other western countries.

Ok, I know not all of you reading this are called to be foster parents.

But, can you be aware?  Can you step up to help another foster parent?

There’s a lot of talk right now about “being a village.”

But no talk of the countless numbers of foster children in our country.

We need to be their village.

The kids need us.

They are alone, they have lost everything, and no, they are not animals that have been abused, but human beings.  Little people.

Children.

Lost in a world that doesn’t care.

I need some volunteers to give me some feed back on my book.  I would love some of you to email me and let me know if you would read it.

By the way?

I wish I had known all of this with my biological children.

Parenting one-on-one.

Email me and get a copy, let me know what you think?

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26 thoughts on “This really did work for me!”

  1. This is something I’ve considered and have talked over with my two natural children. I’m preparing to send one off to college and have 4 years left with the other one. Already feeling the anxiety of not being needed by my older children we’ve looked at other children in need. Have often donated clothes furniture toys etc to shelters and to kids we know cannot get what they need. We agree we should help as much as possible to heal these children. If I can save 1 child then I know I saved 1 soul. To lead them to Christ and teach them not all people are the same and life isn’t what they were dealt. And let them learn from it to be better in the end. Even joined classes to learn about adoption. I would definitely read your book and pray it would give me the information to help others and maybe lead them to be foster parents.

    1. Thanks so much for your thoughts! I totally agree. I will send you a copy of the book later today. It sounds like this has been put on your heart and I hope that through reading the book, you can get all the information you need to clarify the call that the Lord is putting on your heart. Blessings to you and your family, Kate

  2. I would love a copy. We have already had a private home study for adopting from foster care. With no luck…we are in the process of changing to foster/adoption.

    1. Stephanie, I would love to know where you are fostering from, like, county, agency,and what obstacles you are encountering?

  3. We are currently fostering. It’s not easy and not it’s not what you think when you sign up. Like you we never felt a passion for it, but we were called to it and now we want to do our best. Unfortunately we feel hindered by the system to help the child or the family much. I’d love to read your book!

    1. Oh gosh Melissa, I get you 100%. I was never led to be a foster parent, and sometimes shudder to think I may have missed out on this amazing journey. Yes the system does sometimes get in the way, but would love to hear how this impacted you.

    1. Kim, that is so amazing and great. Fostering is sometimes hard, but way more rewarding. I would love to know more of your story.

  4. I would love to read your book. We are a foster to adopt family that is considering turning to another avenue to adopt a child at this juncture. It is not an easy decision, and it has been a long process. Insight of others is always welcome and helpful!

    1. Nicole, would love to talk with you about why this is not happening for you. Would love to know what agency you are with and what are the obstacles in your way. Please reach out to me. Would love to help.

  5. I would love to read your book and give some feedback. We have 3 older bio kids and have adopted one child and are fostering another whose adoption will be finalized this month. It’s honestly the hardest job I’ve ever loved. I read this today, on a particularly hard day, and was encouraged. Thank you.

    1. Michelle, I love that you have embraced fostering and yes, it is the hardest thing you ever do, but, the most rewarding. I am so glad you found this today, when you were discouraged. I can tell you I have sat and cried on the floor more than once, but, never regretted my choices in the end. As a life coach, I have a greater perspective now, but, have never lost my passion for these “lost” children. In fact we are starting a branch of a Christian Fostering Agency in our church. Cannot ever let this go. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for doing what you do. Blessings always.

  6. I would love a copy. We are in the process of starting the foster parent classes. I was a foster parent years ago and loved it.

    1. Michelle, enjoy those classes! I loved every one, I was taught something in each one and every conference, every teaching I ever went too. As a mother of twelve now, I still love those classes. We are in the process of starting a Foster Parent agency branch in our church. I am up for respite and am about to do it all again, those classes, fingerprints, the whole journey. I do not regret one moment then, or one in the immediate future. It is all for the “lost” children. Thank you for stepping up. Thank you for being a part of fostering. Please let me know if you need any help on this next journey.

    2. Michelle, you are like me. This never goes away. Once a foster parent, always one in mind, soul, body and spirit. We are starting a Foster Parent Agency in our church. Can’t let it go. Blessings.

  7. Was a foster parent for 24 years taking in infants right from hospital and kept them until they were adopted. Loved it even though it was very difficult to let them go. Love to read your book.

    1. Sally, I wasn’t as brave as you in the beginning. But, I did take infants, most of which are now teenagers in my home. I too found some of my foster children difficult to let go, but, I have had contact, and am in contact, with more than one child who came through my home, and I got the privilege to pray over, and keep for a certain amount of time. Enjoy the read.

    1. Lina, I do hope you get some small thing from my book. Please feel free to email and communicate with me. I would love questions in any sort or form. My calling is to help those who are currently in this field. My amazing hubby and I are in the midst of beginning a branch of Faithbridge Foster Care in our church. My heart is with you in this mission.

  8. I would love to read your book I have a 24 year old biological son and adopted twin boys and my parents had 3 biological and adopted 5 children through foster care would love to give feed back

    1. No Kathy, it doesn’t unfortunately. We have been blessed to have adopted three sets of twins, miracles, and in my years as a foster parent I so understand the issues that seemed unsurmountable but in hindsight were. I have sent you a copy of the book. Please comment, give me feed back, I want to help all out there who feel like we are islands. Blessings to you and all your family.

    2. Hey Kathy, I love that the foster/adoptive thing carried on through your family. Our first foster kids ah, now nearly twenty-one, came for the weekend. Identical twin boys. You see, I lost an identical twin at two months into my second pregnancy, no one knew. No ultrasounds back then. I so wanted to have twins. I got those twins, three times over because of being a foster parent. I have sent the book and I would love your feedback and any questions you have. Thank you for being that mom.

  9. My husband and I are foster parents. We’ve fostered 12 and our of those we have adopted 2 and in the process for our 3rd. Ages 19 girl/13 boy/2 boy. I would love to read your book. Foster parent training does not prepare you for all the baggage that comes with their traumatic pasts. You just do your best to love them through it and lots of therapy.

    1. Angie, no the training in the most part does not, because, we are really not understanding what it entails at that time. I get you, and feel your pain in the baggage. I somehow thought, or did not think, there would be baggage and how much time, and recourses that would take up. I don’t regret a minute, and, in fact in hindsight, understand, if I was not there, I dread what would have happened to many of the children in my care. I thank God for the therapy, and the most amazing therapist who were there for my kids, then and now. If you have any questions, or need to just ask, please do so. This is what is what I feel I have to offer after fostering some fifty kids and adopting eight. I know the challenge, I know the difficulty, and I so appreciate and pray for you knowing you do too.

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